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Copy of Systematic Reviews RD May 24 to consult with Academic Skills: Qualitative reviews

What is Qualitative Evidence?

If you are new to qualitative research or about to conduct a Qualitative Evidence Synthesis, we recommend you start by reading Chapter 21 of the Cochrane Handbook. 
Key Points:
  • A qualitative evidence synthesis (commonly referred to as QES) can add value by providing decision makers with additional evidence to improve understanding of intervention complexity, contextual variations, implementation, and stakeholder preferences and experiences.
  • A qualitative evidence synthesis can be undertaken and integrated with a corresponding intervention review; or
  • Undertaken using a mixed-method design that integrates a qualitative evidence synthesis with an intervention review in a single protocol.
  • Methods for qualitative evidence synthesis are complex and continue to develop. Authors should always consult current methods guidance at methods.cochrane.org/qi.

Noyes J, Booth A, Cargo M, Flemming K, Harden A, Harris J, Garside R, Hannes K, Pantoja T, Thomas J. Chapter 21: Qualitative evidence. In: Higgins JPT, Thomas J, Chandler J, Cumpston M, Li T, Page MJ, Welch VA (editors). Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions version 6.2 (updated February 2021). Cochrane, 2021. Available from www.training.cochrane.org/handbook.

Some examples of QES

1. 'Perceptions and experiences of labour companionship: a qualitative evidence synthesis'

Bohren, M.A., Berger, B.O., Munthe‐Kaas, H. and Tunçalp, Ö. (2019) 'Perceptions and experiences of labour companionship: a qualitative evidence synthesis', Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, (3), available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/14651858.CD012449.pub2.

2. 'Factors that impact on the use of mechanical ventilation weaning protocols in critically ill adults and children: a qualitative evidence‐synthesis'

Jordan, J., Rose, L., Dainty, K.N., Noyes, J. and Blackwood, B. (2016) 'Factors that impact on the use of mechanical ventilation weaning protocols in critically ill adults and children: a qualitative evidence‐synthesis', Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, (10), available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/14651858.CD011812.pub2.

Search strategy design

 

Developing optimal search strategies for retrieving clinically relevant qualitative studies in EMBASE.

Walters LA, Wilczynski NL, Haynes RB; Hedges Team..

Qual Health Res. 2006 Jan;16(1):162-8.

 

Developing optimal search strategies for retrieving qualitative studies in PsycINFO.

McKibbon KA, Wilczynski NL, Haynes RB.

Eval Health Prof. 2006 Dec;29(4):440-54.

 

Developing optimal search strategies for detecting clinically relevant qualitative studies in MEDLINE.

Wong SS, Wilczynski NL, Haynes RB; Hedges Team..

Stud Health Technol Inform. 2004;107(Pt 1):311-6.

 

Qualitative Search Filters

ISSG Search Filters ResourceThis page shows publications that have reviewed search filter performance and individual search filters.

York: IDENTIFICATION OF QUALITATIVE STUDIES

McMasters: Qualitative Search Filters

 

Search concept tools

SPICE to search for qualitative evidence

  • S = setting – where and in what context?

  • P = perspective – for whom?

  • I = intervention –  (Phenomenon of Interest)–  what?

  • C = comparison – compared with what?

  • E = evaluation – how well and with what result?

     

Booth A. Clear and present questions: formulating questions for evidence based practice. Library Hi Tech. 2006 24 (3): 355-68.

SPIDER to search for qualitative and mixed methods research studies

  • S = Sample

  • PI = Phenomenon of Interest

  • D = Design

  • E = Evaluation

  • R = Research Type

Cooke A, Smith D. Booth A. Beyond PICO: The SPIDER Tool for qualitative evidence synthesis. Qual Health Res. 2012 22(10): 435-43

Qualitative Evidence Synthesis

Dr Andrew Booth has been a systematic review methodologist at ScHARR, University of Sheffield since 1994 having previously worked in health information roles for the NHS, the Medical Research Council and the King´s Fund. Andrew is a Co-Convenor of the Cochrane Qualitative and Implementation Methods Group (CQIMG) and is an Associate Editor for Research Synthesis Methods.

Andrew has co-authored recent guidance for the CQIMG and for the GRADE-CERQual core team. Andrew coordinates the annual three day Evidence Synthesis of Qualitative Research in Europe (ESQUIRE) course at the University of Sheffield. Along with colleagues at ScHARR, he is currently working on the 3rd edition of Systematic Approaches to a Successful Literature Review (London: Sage). The presenter, one of the most prolific authors in QES methodology over recent years, will offer a state of the art summary of QES methodologies in this webinar.

Source: https://evidencesynthesisireland.ie

Thematic synthesis and Framework synthesis

Thematic synthesis and Framework synthesis

Thematic synthesis and Framework synthesis are the two most common and recommended methods of synthesis, featuring in guidance from both Campbell and Cochrane collaborations. Both derive familiarity from their origins as methods of analysis for primary research studies. Use of the two methods in synthesis extends for over a decade during which time the evidence synthesis community has built up a significant body of knowhow on when these methods work and when they don’t work so well. Nevertheless, even experienced proponents of QES are known to confess to falling at the first hurdle in terms of deciding whether a field is well theorized or not. This session offered practical advice illustrated with plentiful examples. It included advice on moving on to consider meta-ethnography if the data allow.